Copied notes on Chevrolet 6 cylinder engines

From: http://www.hotsixes.com/hotsixes/?page_id=9

Chevrolet straight 6

Here is some History on the 6 cylinder Chevy straight six engines.

First Generation
Type inline-6
Production 1929 – 1936
Bore 3.3125 in (84.1 mm)
Stroke 3.75 in (95.3 mm)
Displacement 194 cu in (3.2 L)
Power output 50 hp (37 kW)
The first mass-produced GM inline-6 was introduced in 1929 on Chevrolet cars and trucks, this engine replaced the inline-4. The straight six stovebolt engine was produced from 1929 to 1936.

It was 194 cubic inches (3.2 L) in size and produced 50 hp (37 kW). This engine used a forged steel crankshaft with three bearings and cast iron pistons. Bore and stroke was 3.3125 in (84.14 mm) by 3.75 in (95.25 mm). The 194 was shared with Chevrolet and GMC trucks for 1935 and 1936.
A balanced crankshaft was introduced for 1932, while a higher (5.2:1) compression ratio upped output to 60 hp (45 kW). A new cylinder head two years later pushed output to 80 hp (60 kW).

A 181-cubic-inch (3.0 L) version was used by Chevrolet and GMC trucks in 1935 and 1936.

A 207-cubic-inch (3.4 L) variant was used by Chevrolet and GMC trucks in 1934, 1935 and 1936.

The 2nd inline six produced by Chevrolet was introduced in 1937 & was made until 1963. This engine was also used in Chevrolet trucks.

The New Chevy 6 was larger again with 216-cubic-inch (3.5 L) it boasted a 3.500” (88.90mm) bore and a 3.750” (95.25 mm) stroke. A four main bearing crankshaft & a raise to 6.5:1 compression the new engine produced 85 hp (63 kW). Chevrolet developed a new cylinder head in 1941 the new cylinder head increased hp to 90 hp (67 kW) . In 1949 the compression was raised to 6.6:1 gave an extra 2hp to boost the output to 92 hp (69 kW).

The 235.5-cubic-inch version was released in 1949 it was used in large trucks. Chevrolet increased the bore (3.5625” or 90.49mm) and stroke (3.9375” or 100.01mm). The 235-cubic-inch (3.9 L) was introduced in 1950 to give a bit more power for the new 2 speed Powerglide auto transmission, In 1953 Hydraulic lifters were added & a pressurized oiling system for cars ordered with the Powerglide auto trans. The 216-cubic-inch (3.5 L) continued to be standard powerplant for cars with the 3 speed manual transmission until 1954 when the 235-cubic-inch (3.9 L) became the standard powerplant on all its cars. Two versions were used in 1954 cars – a solid-lifter version with 123 hp (92 kW) for standard transmissions and the hydraulic-lifter 136 hp (101 kW) version (The Blueflame) for Powerglide use.
From 1954 to 1963, the high-pressure 235-cubic-inch engine with mechanical valve lifters was used in trucks. From 1956-1962, all 235-cubic-inch engines used in cars had hydraulic lifters.
The 1953 Corvette engine had the high-pressure 235-cubic-inch engine equipped with mechanical lifters. A 150 hp 235 engine was used in the 1954 Corvette and into 1955. The 235 ci Corvette used the same highlift camshaft as used in the 261 truck engine and triple side draft Carter carbs & a Powerglide transmission & a dual outlet exhaust manifold. The 235 and 261 truck engines were also used by GMC for truck in Canada.

Third member of the Chevrolet inline 6 family was introduced in 1962 to 1988.The new engine was lighter and had a different bell housing bolt pattern. Both auto & manual bell housings & starter motors became interchangeable with Chevy small block and big block V8s.
Other changes on the 3rd generation engine was the crankshafts now had 7 main bearings not 4 like the earlier straight six, Chevrolet decreased the stroke from 3.9375? to 3.25 to produce a 230 ci engine. A new wedge type combustion chamber like the V8 was also used. The valve train was changed from a shaft type & an increase from 1.5 to 1 ratio was increased to 1.75 to 1 like the big block chevys used, Chevrolet passenger cars used the new style engine until 1977, In the Camaro,Chevy Nova & full size trucks it was used until 1979. These vehicals previously used the Stovebolt sixes. In the mid-1970s, the V6 engine like the Buick V6 231& later the 200 ci & in the 1980 the 229 3.8 V6 Chevy to over from the inline six in passenger car. GM continued to use the inline 6 in trucks and vans until 1988. Brazil used the straight six in the Chevrolet Opala from 1969 to 1992 . The inline Chevy six were converted for marine use by Volvo Penta & mercrusier & were also used to run power generation & used in forklifts.

In 1970 GM made the inline 6 the base engine with the Chevy II/Nova with either a 230 or 250 ci engine, Applications:
1962-1969 Chevy II
1967-1971 Postal Jeep
1968-1992 Chevrolet Opala (Brazil)

194

194 was used in both Chevrolet and GMC trucks.
1962-1967 Chevy II
1964-1967 Chevrolet Chevelle
1965-1966 Studebaker Commander, Daytona 1966 only, Cruiser and Wagonaire

230
The 230 Replaced 235 cubic inches (3.9 L). It was also used by Chevrolet and GMC trucks, primarily the half-tons. It produced 140 hp (100 kW). The 230 had a firing order of 1-5-3-6-2-4 rotating clockwise. This engine was used on the following vehicles:
1964 Chevrolet Chevelle
1965-1968 Checker Marathon
1965 Chevrolet El Camino
1966-1970 Chevrolet Nova
1966 Studebaker Commander, Wagonaire, Daytona and Cruiser
1967 Chevrolet Chevelle
1967 Chevrolet Camaro
1968 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu
1969 Chevrolet Camaro
1969 Chevrolet Chevelle

3.8
The Pontiac 3.8 was a special SOHC version of the standard 230-cubic-inch (3.8 L) I6. An optional W53 version on the Firebird produced 215 hp (160 kW).
This engine was used on the following vehicles:
1967 Pontiac Firebird
1967 Pontiac Tempest Sprint coupe

250
The stroked 250 version produced 155 hp (116 kW) for Chevrolet and GMC. Between 1975 – 1984, an integrated cylinder head was produced, with one-barrel intakes for passenger cars, and two-barrel intakes for trucks after 1978.
Passenger car use of the 250-cubic-inch (4.1 L) engine was discontinued after the 1979

This engine was used on the following vehicles:
1966-1984 Chevrolet (passenger cars to 1979, trucks/vans to 1984)
1968-1976 Pontiac Firebird
1968-1970 Pontiac Tempest
1968-1976 Pontiac LeMans
1968-1969 Buick Special
1968-1972 Oldsmobile F-85
1975-1976 Oldsmobile Cutlass
1971-1975 Pontiac Ventura
1968-1971 Buick Skylark
1968-1979 Chevrolet Camaro
1969-1979 Checker Marathon
1968-1992 Chevrolet Opala (Brazil)

L22
The L22 was a 250-cubic-inch (4.1 L) I6 engine produced from 1967 to 1979. The ‘78 Camaro had 105 horsepower (78 kW) and 190 ft·lbf (260 N·m) of torque with the 250.

LD4
The LD4 was a 250-cubic-inch (4.1 L) I6 engine produced strictly in 1978.

LE3
The LE3 was a 250-cubic-inch (4.1 L) I6 engine produced from 1979 to 1984.

292
The 292 was only used in Chevrolet and GMC trucks; the block deck is taller, along with a relocated passenger-side engine mount. These were produced between 1963 to 1990; production of the engine shifted to Mexico after 1984.

L25
The L25 was GM’s “last” pushrod straight-6 engine, produced from 1977 to 1988. It was used in Chevrolet trucks, displaced 292 cubic inches (4.8 L) and produced 115 hp (86 kW) and 215 ft·lbf (292 N·m).

The Chevrolet straight six has been used from the early days in sedans & trucks, It became popular with many hot rodders & racers. Over the years there have been many brands of headers, aluminum cylinder heads, hotter grind camshafts, 2 & 4 barrel manifolds + a huge range of multi carb intakes from speed equipment companies both large & small. Many back yard & home work shop creations have also been invented.

Pictures below show the Chevy Blue flame straight six inlet & exhaust manifold compared to the later Chevy straight six engine. Note the blueflame manifold has round exhaust ports. The later L6 has rectangular ports.

Chevy Straight six engine specs bore and stroke sizes

194: 3.563×3.25
215: 3.750×3.25
230: 3.875×3.25
250: 3.875×3.53
292: 3.875×4.125

firing order
1-5-3-6-2-4
Chevrolet straight six engine were available in many body styles.

Chevy Nova
Chevrolet Camaro
Buick Apollo
Buick skylark
Pontiac Firebird
Tempest, LeMans
Chevelle/Malibu
Buick Special/Grand Sport
Biscayne/Bel Air/Impala/Caprice
Chevy Blazer
Chevy pickup trucks
GMC trucks

Chevy straight six crankshaft strokes.

Straight six Chevrolet crankshafts from these engines will interchange. There are 3 basic crank types.

194/230 (3.25? stroke)

250 (3.53? stroke)

292 (4.125? stroke)

The 292 cubic inch straight six engine has a different conrod journal diameter. When swapping cranks it is recommended both crank & rods be swapped as an assembly.

Some parts that will & wont interchange between Chevy engines
starter motors,

Most chevy sixes run a through bell housing starter motor

harmonic balancers,

Do not interchange with small block or v6 chevys as the pulley on the balancer is integrated with the balancer, bolt on pulleys are used to run air con,power steering & air pumps.
Push rods,

The pushrod length on the chevy six is a length of its own & will not interchange with small or big block Chevrolets
Conrods & rod bearings,

Due to rod length & big end sizes they do not interchange with v8 engines.
rocker arms & roller rockers,

Despite having a ratio very similar the rocker length is not the same
camshafts and timing gear sets,

The 292 chevy six does not interchange with the smaller cube engines.
Fuel pumps,

292 Chevrolet straight six engines had the fuel pump switched to the other side of the engine block, The lobe on the camshaft that operates the fuel pump lever is not in the same location as the smaller cubic inch engines.
Distributors,

from v6 Chevrolet, small or big blocks do not swap either

Information that can also be useful.
crankshaft tunnel alignment is very important when changing rotating assemblies .

Crankshaft weights on casting # 407/407N are 10 lbs lighter than crankshaft casting # 802 the conrod,piston,flywheel & harmonic balancer weights will also need to be matched if swapping cranks.

Cylinder heads can be shaved .060 to .080 without affecting the head face.

Head bolt bosses that run through the intake ports can provide more airflow if reduced and reshaped or removed & replaced with crush tubes

It is a known problem that the blocks can get cracks from the head bolt on the front drivers side to the water pump. This can be prevented by installing head studs when rebuilding,

Any straight six Chevy engine made before 1975 was not designed to run unleaded fuel. It is advised to fit hardened valve seats & higher grade exhaust valves to over come future problems

Fiber camshaft timing gears run a lot quieter than steel or aluminum cam sprockets. The down side is they can strip at any time & is more prone in older engines. It is advised if you are changing your camshaft or hotting up your chevy inliner that both cam & crank gears be repaced as they are designed to be run as a matched set.

This mad straight blown six cylinder powered flamed altered leaving the line…in a case like this “6 in a row is the only way to go”

Change Mac background image

10.5 Leopard and 10.6 Snow Leopard:

Go to Your Hard Drive > System > Library > CoreServices. You’ll find DefaultDesktop.jpg; this is the startup image.
Drag it to your desktop (or other folder) to save it in case you ever want to put it back.
Find the image you want to replace it with and rename it DefaultDesktop.jpg (the new image must be a JPG).
Drag your new DefaultDesktop.jpg into the CoreServices folder.
Upon restart, you’ll see your customized image!

Note: If you are using 10.4 or previous (I think this is applicable back to at least 10.2), this trick will still work. However, the name and location are different; go to Your Hard Drive > Library > Desktop Pictures and replace Aqua Blue.jpg.

Note #2: This may go without saying, but you will need to make sure you’re the admin user to you know, go changing things and stuff.

Copied from Small Dog Electronics

Penetrating Oil — Home Recipe

Re: 1992,1.6 liters,oil pan???
Posted by: “outlawmws” outlawmws@yahoo.com outlawmws
Tue Dec 8, 2009 6:52 am (PST)

For you guys in the rustbelt, A 50/50 mix of automatic tranny fluid and acetone is supposed to be the best penetrent there is for loosening rusted bolts. (It was tested somewhere against all the commercial penetrents)

-Outlaw

ps: And this:

— In Suzuki4x4-Tech@yahoogroups.com, r rowzee wrote:
>
>
> what ever you take apart always put anti seize on the bolts and nuts when putting back together so the threads don’t rust and are easy to remove next time .

=====
Machinist’s Workshop magazine tested penetrants for break out torque on rusted nuts. They arranged a subjective test of all the popular penetrants with the control being the torque required to remove the nut from a “scientifically rusted” environment. The results are as follows;
Penetrating oil….. Average load
None ………………… 516 pounds
WD-40 ……………… 238 pounds
PB Blaster …………. 214 pounds
Liquid Wrench ….. 127 pounds
Kano Kroil ………… 106 pounds
ATF-Acetone mix….53 pounds
The ATF-Acetone mix was a “home brew” mix of 50-50 automatic transmission fluid and acetone.

Dished versus flat top pistons

http://bbs.zuwharrie.com/content/topic,88177.0.html

NOW the 1.3 stuff.

STOCK 1.3 cylinder head volume = 33cc
Stock 1.3 “dished piston” volume = 3.8cc
1.3 “flat top” piston volume (the valve notches) = 1.5cc

Stock 1.6 head volume = 32cc
Deck clearance = .010
I checked this on 2 different blocks, its varied a bit, so I averaged them at .010. If anyone wants to check deck at tdc on another stock 1.3 and compare, it would help.

Looking at the information above I finally realized something that I had missed in the past. The 1.6 cylinder head combustion chamber is the same size, or smaller than the 1.3. In the past, I had always just cut the heads until I ended up with the volume I was looking for. I had never cc’s a totally stock 1.6. Interesting yeah? I kinda feel like I missed the boat on that one all this time. So now there is 0 reason really to not run the 1.6 head. The fuel pump is the only thing that could be argued, but it’s a week one in my opinion.

So compression ratios:
Stock head stock 1.6 head gasket. Factory replacement dished pistons.
stock bore 8.6-1
.030 over pistons= 8.8
.060 pistons = 8.98

Flat top pistons
stock bore 9.1
.030 9.2
.060 9.4

Cutting block down to arrive at 0 deck using the flat top pistons.
stock bore 9.2
.030 9.4
.060 9.6

Cutting .010 from the cylinder head yields about .2’s more compression ratio on a stock bore.

Samurai engine parts interchange

1324 AKA 1.3 most common sammy motor will have 1324 on block. I’ve seen differnces in these blocks in regards to casting desighns, Like the 1298 mentioned above, some (very few as I can tell) also were cast fro squirters and oild drainback provisions for a turbo, interstingly enough, the engines so built do not have an engine ID number machined into srface next to bell housing. One of these blocks would also be a good turbo build up.

1590 8valve sohc aka 1.6 engine found in kicks and tracks, g16kc is another name for it.
1590l 16v sohc aka 16v engine, kicks and tracks, g16kv is its other name.

1324 engine.
Bore 74mm
Stroke 77mm
rod diameter 1.6529-1.6535
main diam. 1.771-1.7716
pistons are a press fit pin.
Bell houseing pattern is same as 1298. 1590 engines can easily be adapted with trail tuff or similar adapter plate.
ITM lists the pistons the same as the 1298 engine but thats because the itm’s were machined for keeper grooves, neer as I can tell, 1298 are full floating pins where this engine, the 1324, has press fit pins.
rings however are catlogged as different numbers, I’ve never looked into why but I assume its related to ring size/desighn. This should not pose a problem as long as the pistons you buy include rings.
Flat top pistons are sourced from 3 cylinder 1000cc sprint engine. This yeild more compression. Remember you need 4. All thats required to put these psitons in are the pistons themselves. So don’t bother with the low compression pistons. I have also found the 1298 pistons will work and are flat tops as well, this seems to be the piston that hawk sells as a flat top piston. Also keep in mind that on the 1324 engine that the pin keepers are not needed as these (the 1324) engines use the press fit pins.
As the hi compression pistons will work I am looking into the con rods and psitons from the turbo sprint for a more robust forced induction bottom end. Does anyone know if the turbo sprint pistons were forged? same rod length as the sammy rod?
This would be helpful for a proper turbo build on a 8v

main bearings are the same as 1298
Rod bearings are same as 1298

camshafts will interchange between any of the 8v heads 1298, 1324, 1590. However I’ve always used the distributor houseing that belongs to the camshafts original motor as I have had end play issues when not doing this. So 1.3 cam will work in a 1.6 head as long as you use the 1.3 houseing. Some may have done this without a concern, I still recomend it.

Rocker arms are the same as 1298 up intill 95 where the disighn changed. They are also same as 1590.

Cam gears are the same as 1298 and 1590
cam bolts are same as well.
Timing belt is same as 89-94 1298
Timing belt tension is same as 89-94 1298 and 1590

Intake valves are same as 1298 90-97
exhaust valves are the same 1298 90-97 exhaust valves from 1590 will work with custom cyl head machineing.
Valve springs are same as 1298. 1590 valve springs will interchange and have more spring pressure. Be sure to check for coil stacking and proper pressures depending on the cam you are uesing. small block chevy springs for 1.6 installed height is the hot rod Hi rpm jones. I like 75-80#’s on the seat and around 225 open
Valve guids will interchange from 1298 ans 1590, however, depending on manufactrurer, length on guides may need modification.

Connecting rods will interchange with 1298 90-97 model years neer as I can tell at this point.

Balancers, still working on this, 1298 balancers will bolt on and have correct seal diameter, however the ones I’ve seen from a 1298 may or may not be setup for your belt drive. This goes for 1590 as well. The balancers will physically bolt on, but the differences lay in belt arangement.
Balancer bolts are same as 1298, 1590, and 1590l

Valve covers, interchangable from 1298 and 1590, almost all of them will bolt onto each other. If its an 8v head its a good bet. Late model 94? and up cars with 8v 1298 engines and 1324 engine used an aluminum cover that seals better and can be cleaned up easier. good yard find. VC gaskets are catalogged diferent depending on gasket manufacturer. Best bet is to get gasket for v.covers original car application

Cylinder head. will swap from 1298 strait across. Later model heads May or may not have fuel pump functionality. 1590 cylinder head will bolt on but does not have provision for fuel pump cast into it.
1300 dohc swift gti head will bolt on as well,with the gti bolts though I have never got that engine running to finish the notes on it. gti timing componants are also needed. As would the gti head gasket.

1590l head will bolt on too with the 1590l head bolts. I have bolted this combo together but have not yet run it or finished it. It APPEARS that with the 1324 (or 1298) cam gear on the 1590l cam that the 1324 (or 1298) timing belt would work. Again I don’t know that and it wouild take some tensioner work in any case.

Head gasket, 1298 will work fine, be sure to pay attention to the hole for oil feed to head. This is critical. 1590 gasket will work as well and is recomended (by me for what thats worth) for large overbores (.020 and up) and anytime a 1590 head is used on the 1324 or 1298 block.

Head bolts, use 1298 or 1590 bolts, 1590l bolts are different

Main bolts are same as 1298. Unknown if 1590 and 1590l bolts are same.
intake manifolds. 1298 manifolds, weather carbed or injected will bolt on fine. 1590 manifolds will work but is not recomended on 1324 head as head ports are smaller, if useing the 1590 head its better to port the 1324 or 1298 manifold to 1590 gasket size for intake oprts. Either way some porting will be necassary.
Intake manifold gaskets are same as 1298, 1590 are larger to accomodate larger ports. 1590 gasket can be used on 1298 and 1324 apps without leakage as the gasket is larger.

exhaust manifolds will interchange from 1298 and 1590 though there are desighn differences, but they will bolt on. 1590 manifold is more tubular in desighn with better cross section and longer “primary” this is most likely a performance improveing peice though I have never tested it. 1590 manifolds also seem crack prone.

Oil pans and pickups will interchange from 1298 and 1590 and 1590l engines, use the matching pair of pickup and pan. Non lifted apps need to be very carefull with pan to front housing clearence as 1590 pans are larger and may hit front axle during some conditions.

Oil pumps will interchange with 1590 and 1294 engines, also a 1.3 GTI oil pump will bolt to a 1298 and 1324 engine as well as 1590. (this is per SARGE, again thanx alot for the info)
Flywheels, 1298 wheels are same. 1590 engine swaps will use 1298 or 1324 wheel on 1590 engine for bellhouseing fit reasons.
Clutches are standard sammy clutches, though on Hi HP engines (don’t laugh I know its hard) I like the clutch that TNT diversified sells. Its a special disc with a specially sprung Pressure plate.
Flywheel bolts are same with 1298, 1590 and 1590l engines.

dISTRIBUTORS, 1298 and 1590 dist will fit, thing to remember is how you want run the engine management, Fuel injected engines will need correct dist. Not in scope right now to go into all that but just remember 1590 swaps will use factory carbed 1298 and 1324 mechanical/vacume distributors.
1590l 1.6 16valve engines that are run carburated (custom carb setup) will also use the 1.3 mechanical distrubutor for ignition controll if the proper modification to distributor shaft end and disributor hold down slot are made. This is a really easy way to run indv. carbs on a 16v if you want the hotrod motor without the injection. I will cover this later as there are some differences that need to be over come due to dist rotation.

Oil pumps, 1298 will work as will1590. There may be some small differnces in bypass and pressure, but they will bolt on and run and give adequate oil pressure.

1324 torque specs
Headbolts 50 ft#
main bolts 40ft#
cam gear 45ft#
crank bolt 50ft#
flywheel 55ft#
con rod 26ft#

This engine (the 1324) most likel;y what came in your sammy, they are a good engine with few problems. Most need a good rebuild by know. Blocks are tough and will not hardly ever ridge, so a quick and easy bottle hone, rings, bearings and valve job with seals will probably fix all you concers. Heads have a tendancy to burn valves.

COMPRESSION RATIO INFORMATION
STOCK 1.3 cylinder head volume = 33cc
Stock 1.3 “dished piston” volume = 3.8cc
1.3 “flat top” piston volume (the valve nothes) = 1.5cc

Stock 1.6 head volume = 32cc
Deck clearance = .010
I checked this on 2 different blocks, its varied a bit, so I averaged them at .010. If anyone wants to check deck at tdc on another stock 1.3 and compare, it would help.

Looking at the information above I finally realized something that I had missed in the passed. The 1.6 cylinder head combustion chamber is the same size, or smaller than the 1.3. In the past, I had always just cut the heads until I ended up with the volume I was looking for. I had never cc’s a totally stock 1.6. Interesting yeah? I kinda feel like I missed the boat on that one all this time. So now there is 0 reason really to not run the 1.6 head. The fuel pump is the only thing that could be argued, but its a week one in my opinion.

So compression ratios:
Stock head stock 1.6 head gasket. Factory replacement dished pistons.
stock bore 8.6-1
.030 over pistons= 8.8
.060 pistons = 8.98

Flat top pistons
stock bore 9.1
.030 9.2
.060 9.4

Cutting block down to arrive at 0 deck using the flat top pistons.
stock bore 9.2
.030 9.4
.060 9.6

Cutting .010 from the cylinder head yields about .2’s more compression ratio on a stock bore.